Copyright 2017 Jason Ross, All Rights Reserved

A few years ago I was working in The City of London. The company I worked for had a very good development process – continuous integration, unit testing and several test environments before production (the sort of thing described in Eliminating Failed Deployments – Part 1 – Replication! Automation! Complication?). Environment-specific values were automatically inserted into configuration files and deployments were made by staff who weren’t developers.

With all that, you’d expect that deployments went perfectly, but they didn’t. We still had problems that weren’t always enough to warrant rolling back the deployment, but WERE enough to cause delays and the occasional frantic phone calls and debugging sessions.

One particular deployment faltered because the deployment didn’t update some permissions to match the other changes it had made. After you experience problems like this a few times, it’s easy to see how obsession can build up.

Whatever development method you use, eventually your software will need to be deployed to your production environment.

It’s a scenario that occurs in every company with a software development team: the software is declared to be finished and ready to be deployed from development into production. The deployment scripts and installers are ready (if you’re not using installers then that’s a totally different set of problems), and there is an air of tension around the team responsible for the deployment. That air of tension is actually the first serious warning sign and you should take notice of it.

Visual Studio is very good at migrating solutions and projects from its older versions. However everything has limits, and I’ve seen a few very rare cases where it doesn’t quite work. The main problem I’ve encountered can be recreated as follows:

How is the software that's installed on your systems built? Do your developers manually build every version on their machines, or do they use a dedicated build system? If you don't know, ask your development manager to show you the latest build on the build system. If they're not sure, ask one of your senior developers; ideally their answer will be along the lines of "Which build server do you want to see?".

If they can't show you the build system, ask them whether they're using Continuous Integration, or CI, to build the software. If they're not, ask them why not; bear in mind there is NO right answer to this question!

Developing software is a process that involves a lot of repetitious work. Building the code, updating configuration files, creating database change scripts, unit testing, deploying and integration testing are all tasks that are repeated many times during development.

Whatever anyone tells you, none of these tasks are exciting, in fact most of them are tedious and prone to error. That’s why so many developers automate them; if they run correctly once, they’ll keep on doing that. Remember, computers are faster and more reliable than people. Automating these parts of the development process is a problem solved.

Why is it then, that the tests run by so many testers are manual?